link Latinx Mental Health Home

A group of Latinx students poses in a group on a "Day of the Dead" event.

Latino/Hispanic Mental Health

Anxiety and Depression Association of America

Anxiety and depression-based conditions rank first and second as the most commonly experienced mental disorders affecting Americans today. An estimated one out of every six adults will experience depression at some point in their lives , while approximately half of those diagnosed with depression will also have an anxiety disorder.

Not surprisingly, anxiety and depression are significant mental health issues in the Latino community.

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America or ADAA offers a safe place for people to support one another and talk to people who understand. They are a non-profit organization that serves over 11 million visitors a year. Most of the resources offered are free, some of which include:


Therapy for Latinx

Therapy for Latinx acknowledges the stigma surrounding mental health problems and how difficult it is to find a therapist that understands the Hispanic culture. This site provides a way to search for Latino therapists that you can meet using telehealth or in person-to-person video sessions. With their search bar, you can look for a therapist by:

  • Name
  • Specialty
  • Type of health insurance covered
  • Therapist by gender
  • Payment type

As long as a therapist is licensed in your state, they can work with you.


National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

(1-800)273-TALK (8255)

When mental and emotional problems go untreated, things can boil over to a point of desperation. When this happens, having someone to listen and talk with can mean the difference between working through a traumatic, temporary situation and doing something that can’t be undone. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline offers free and confidential emotional support for anyone who’s in emotional distress or considering suicide.

Their helpline, which is called Lifeline, is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Lifeline consists of a national network of more than 180 local crisis centers. Their crisis centers will not only help you through times of crisis but refer you to resources in your community, many of which offer free services. Lifeline also offers its service for Spanish-speaking callers along with a resource page.


La Familia

San Francisco Bay Area

First founded in the 1980s, La Familia has a solid history of providing mental health and community support services that meet the needs of individuals and families in the San Francisco Bay area. La Familia understands the mental health issues facing the Latino community and fights to bring about the systems and services that can improve the quality of life for all community members.

Along with counseling and case management services, La Familia runs several crisis hotlines that answer calls 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Here’s a partial list of their available crisis lines:

  • Domestic violence
  • Runaways
  • Eating disorders
  • Youth crisis hotlines
  • Dating abuse
  • Suicide
  • Veterans assistance
  • Addiction recovery

SAMHSA’s National Helpline

(1-800)662-HELP(4357)

The SAMHSA National Helpline offers free, confidential, mental health, and substance abuse treatment referral services. SAMHSA provides both English- and Spanish-speaking phone assistance at any time of the day or night, even holidays.

Phone representatives can refer you to local drug and alcohol treatment facilities, support groups, and other community-based organizations. You can also order free mental health information resources online and over the phone. Whether you have health insurance or not, SAMHSA can help you find affordable treatment help.


More Resources to Check Out