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Business Careers

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What Can You Do with a Business Degree?

A degree in business is versatile - the skills gained in a business degree are widely applicable across most industries and in many careers. In terms of skills, entry-level jobs for business majors depend on candidates who possess critical thinking, leadership potential, the ability to communicate, analytical thinking, and financial acumen.

If you live in Santa Clara, San Jose, Silicon Valley, or anywhere in the Bay Area, consider taking Business courses at Mission College. We offer hands-on training, mentorship, and placement in internships at companies including Apple, Facebook, Google, and LinkedIn. 

An associate’s degree or certificate in business can provide you with the knowledge on which to launch or advance a career, and 85 percent of students at Mission graduate with a degree in two years.

 

Classes are offered online as well as face-to-face, and many students attend part-time.

You might also consider transferring to a four-year school in the Cal State or University of California systems, to earn a bachelor's degree in business. Eventually, an MBA or other graduate degree may be your ultimate goal. Salaries rise with education levels.

However, if you're not keen on committing to a full degree, consider a certificate program in subjects like Business Computing, Entrepreneurship, Project Management, or Data Analytics.

As the field of Business is constantly changing, Business Certificates (including many offered totally online) are an excellent way to expand or improve upon your current skill set.


Seven In-Demand Jobs for Business Majors

Ok, so an education is important. But what are you going to do with your Business degree or certificate? Here are seven of the top jobs to choose from.

1. Project Manager
2. Marketing Manager
3. Digital Analyst
4. Social Media Marketer
5. Financial Manager
6. Accountant/CPA/CMA


1. Project Manager

Project managers are always in demand. Regardless of the industry, qualified people are always needed to plan and track work. Staying organized, leading teams, effectively communicating, and keeping track of budgets are vital to all types of organizations.

Whether you're already working in this capacity, or you'd like to transition to  a new career, earning a Project Management Certificate (PMP® certification) is an excellent way to boost your salary.

At Mission, our Project Management Certificate offers PMP® training certification. Learn about project integration, scope, cost management, software tools, project control, human resource management, risk management, quality management, procurement management, communications management and PMP®/CAPM® test preparation. 

Project managers with PMP® certification earn 23 percent more than their non-certified peers. According to a 2019 survey of almost 9,000 project managers by the Project Management Institute, non-certified respondents made $100,247 per year, with a PMP® certification the average salary increased to $123,314.1

The demand for project managers is also high, with a projected 22 million new jobs opening through 2027.2


2. Marketing Manager

A marketing manager is employed to attract more customers by bringing awareness to the product or organization through marketing campaigns. While this is the over-riding purpose behind marketing, the field is complex and specialized in the digital age.

For example, marketing manager job descriptions used to primarily outline duties involving print advertising, broadcast media, sales, and promotions. These days, most marketing professionals specialize in one or more areas like search engine optimization, content strategy, social media marketing, public relations, business communications, and product marketing. 

In terms of college, you don't need to earn a degree in marketing to become a marketing professional - many marketing professionals studied Business, Communication, journalism, or advertising. 


3. Digital Analyst

With the increasing need to make sense of the infinite amount of data produced online, digital analysts assist marketing teams by making strategic and data-driven decisions.

Working closely with various departments in an organization, as a digital analyst, you'll use your quantitative skills in math to develop and test the key performance indicators (KPIs) of marketing campaigns. 

Consequently computer programming and math skills will get your resume to the top of the pile. If this sounds up your alley, consider our Data Analyst Certificate. Study Python programming, Microsoft Excel, database management systems, and business communications.


4. Social Media Marketer

As a social media marketer, you'll plan and post digital content on Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, and Instagram. You'll also share content from other accounts, and drive traffic to your organization by engaging with people through comments, likes, and other types of digital interactions.

Social media jobs range, employing job titles like social media specialist or community manager. Strong writing and communication skills are key, in addition to the ability to adapt to new technologies. It's also important to understand the demographics and behaviors of your customers online, and transform data into shareable insights.


Lina Kawas

I graduated from Mission College in Spring 2016 with an A.S. in Business and transferred to UCSD for the Fall 2016 term. I found a community at Mission with other students who were just as motivated to transfer to a university as I was. I'm so grateful for the people I've met - including all the amazing faculty and staff at the school that helped me reach my journey.

Lina Kawas '16

Senior Loan Consultant

Read Her Story
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5. Financial Manager

Employment of financial managers is projected to grow 17 percent from 2020 to 2030, much faster than the average for all occupations.3 About 64,200 openings for financial managers are projected each year, on average, over the decade.

Finance manager job duties include handling financial activities and functions including accounting, budget, credit, insurance, tax, and treasury. The scope of the job also ensures compliance with the government's financial regulations.

Relevant skills for finance managers include accounting, budgeting, forecasting, financial reporting, leadership, and interpersonal communication. In addition, IT skills are increasingly a vital factor when it comes to success in the field.

Furthermore, If you can demonstrate knowledge in predictive analysis and SAP accounting software, you'll gain a major advantage over folks who lack it.



6. Accountant/CPA/CMA

Accounting careers deals with financial records and figures, and making efficient decisions based on financial analysis. Accountants work in all types of organizations as the skills are essential. Online Accounting degrees are available, if you need more flexibility in your schedule as a working adult.

In terms of education, many accountants earn an associate's degree in Accounting or a certificate in Accounting. As a regulated industry, the more qualifications you earn, the higher your salary will be. This why many accountants prepare for a CPA or CMA certification or study SAP software in school.

According to the Institute of Management Accountants, CPAs and CMAs earn 47% more in the U.S. than their working peers that do not hold the CMA or CPA designation.3 Mission College can help you prepare these two well-regarded credentials.


Next Steps

Ready to get going? You may either chat with us from this page, or eview our Business and Accounting programs. We offer the training, mentorship, and up-to-date coursework you need to launch your career or get ahead.

We can even help you land an internship at a major Silicon Valley organization with the help of our Career Center or the Year Up organization.

Request more info today.


Sources

1. Earning Power: Project Management Salary Survey—Eleventh Edition (2020).

2. PMI (2017). Project Management Job Growth and Talent Gap 2017–2027.

3. Charles, S. (2018). IMA'S GLOBAL SALARY SURVEY. Strategic Finance, 99(9), 28-39. Retrieved from http://0-library.wvm.edu/scholarly-journals/imas-global-salary-survey/docview/2062946613/se-2?accountid=39962